Thursday, December 17, 2009

Attention security researchers! Submit your new 2009 Web Hacking Techniques

Update 01.04.2010: Voting process is commencing this week! Expert judges are Rich Mogull, Dinis Cruz, Chris Hoff, HD Moore, Billy Rios, Dan Kaminsky, Romain Gaucher, Steven Christey, Jeff Forristal, and Michal Zalewski.

Update
: Awesome news, Black Hat is generously sponsoring the effort! The researcher topping the list will be awarded a free pass to attend the BlackHat USA Briefings 2010!

Just 2 weeks left in 2009. Time to start collecting all the latest published research in preparation for the coveted Top Ten Web Hacking Techniques list!

Every year Web security community produces dozens of new hacking techniques documented in white papers, blog posts, magazine articles, mailing list emails, etc. We are not talking about individual vulnerability instances with CVE numbers, nor intrusions / incidents, but the actual new methods of Web attack. Some target the website, some target the browser, or somewhere in between.

Historically many of these works would permanently reside in obscure and overlooked corners of the Web. Now it its fourth year the list provides a centralized reference point and recognizes researchers who have contributed to the advancement of our industry.

The top ten winners will be selected by a panel of judges (names to be announced soon) on the basis of novelty, potential impact, and overall pervasiveness. Those researchers topping the list can expect to receive praise amongst their peers as have those in past years (2006, 2007, 2008).

Then coming up at IT-Defense (Feb.) and RSA USA 2010 (Mar.) it will be my great honor to introduce each of the top ten during my “2010: A Web Hacking Odyssey” presentations. Each technique will be described in technical detail for how they work, what they can do, who they affect, and how best to defend against them. Audiences get an opportunity to better understand the newest attacks believed most likely to be used against us in the future.

To make all this happen we are going to need a lot of help from the community. At the bottom of this post will be the living master list of everything published. If anything is missing, and we know for a fact there is, please comment containing the link to the research. We understand that while not every technique is as powerful as another, please make every effort to include them anyway, nothing should be considered too insignificant. You never know what method might be found useful another researcher down the road.

Thank you and good luck!


The Complete List
  1. Persistent Cookies and DNS Rebinding Redux
  2. iPhone SSL Warning and Safari Phishing
  3. RFC 1918 Blues
  4. Slowloris HTTP DoS
  5. CSRF And Ignoring Basic/Digest Auth
  6. Hash Information Disclosure Via Collisions - The Hard Way
  7. Socket Capable Browser Plugins Result In Transparent Proxy Abuse
  8. XMLHTTPReqest “Ping” Sweeping in Firefox 3.5+
  9. Session Fixation Via DNS Rebinding
  10. Quicky Firefox DoS
  11. DNS Rebinding for Credential Brute Force
  12. SMBEnum
  13. DNS Rebinding for Scraping and Spamming
  14. SMB Decloaking
  15. De-cloaking in IE7.0 Via Windows Variables
  16. itms Decloaking
  17. Flash Origin Policy Issues
  18. Cross-subdomain Cookie Attacks
  19. HTTP Parameter Pollution (HPP)
  20. How to use Google Analytics to DoS a client from some website.
  21. Our Favorite XSS Filters and how to Attack them
  22. Location based XSS attacks
  23. PHPIDS bypass
  24. I know what your friends did last summer
  25. Detecting IE in 12 bytes
  26. Detecting browsers javascript hacks
  27. Inline UTF-7 E4X javascript hijacking
  28. HTML5 XSS
  29. Opera XSS vectors
  30. New PHPIDS vector
  31. Bypassing CSP for fun, no profit
  32. Twitter misidentifying context
  33. Ping pong obfuscation
  34. HTML5 new XSS vectors
  35. About CSS Attacks
  36. Web pages Detecting Virtualized Browsers and other tricks
  37. Results, Unicode Left/Right Pointing Double Angel Quotation Mark
  38. Detecting Private Browsing Mode
  39. Cross-domain search timing
  40. Bonus Safari XXE (only affecting Safari 4 Beta)
  41. Apple's Safari 4 also fixes cross-domain XML theft
  42. Apple's Safari 4 fixes local file theft attack
  43. A more plausible E4X attack
  44. A brief description of how to become a CA
  45. Creating a rogue CA certificate
  46. Browser scheme/slash quirks
  47. Cross-protocol XSS with non-standard service ports
  48. Forget sidejacking, clickjacking, and carjacking: enter “Formjacking”
  49. MD5 extension attack
  50. Attack - PDF Silent HTTP Form Repurposing Attacks
  51. XSS Relocation Attacks through Word Hyperlinking
  52. Hacking CSRF Tokens using CSS History Hack
  53. Hijacking Opera’s Native Page using malicious RSS payloads
  54. Millions of PDF invisibly embedded with your internal disk paths
  55. Exploiting IE8 UTF-7 XSS Vulnerability using Local Redirection
  56. Pwning Opera Unite with Inferno’s Eleven
  57. Using Blended Browser Threats involving Chrome to steal files on your computer
  58. Bypassing OWASP ESAPI XSS Protection inside Javascript
  59. Hijacking Safari 4 Top Sites with Phish Bombs
  60. Yahoo Babelfish - Possible Frame Injection Attack - Design Stringency
  61. Gmail - Google Docs Cookie Hijacking through PDF Repurposing & PDF
  62. IE8 Link Spoofing - Broken Status Bar Integrity
  63. Blind SQL Injection: Inference thourgh Underflow exception
  64. Exploiting Unexploitable XSS
  65. Clickjacking & OAuth
  66. Google Translate - Google User Content - File Uploading Cross - XSS and Design Stringency - A Talk
  67. Active Man in the Middle Attacks
  68. Cross-Site Identification (XSid)
  69. Microsoft IIS with Metasploit evil.asp;.jpg
  70. MSWord Scripting Object XSS Payload Execution Bug and Random CLSID Stringency
  71. Generic cross-browser cross-domain theft
  72. Popup & Focus URL Hijacking
  73. Advanced SQL injection to operating system full control (whitepaper)
  74. Expanding the control over the operating system from the database
  75. HTML+TIME XSS attacks
  76. Enumerating logins via Abuse of Functionality vulnerabilities
  77. Hellfire for redirectors
  78. DoS attacks via Abuse of Functionality vulnerabilities
  79. URL Spoofing vulnerability in bots of search engines (#2)
  80. URL Hiding - new method of URL Spoofing attacks
  81. Exploiting Facebook Application XSS Holes to Make API Requests
  82. Unauthorized TinyURL URL Enumeration Vulnerability


36 comments:

Anonymous said...

MD5 extension attack for sure!
http://netifera.com/research

A lot of sites ARE STILL affected (some BIG)

Anonymous said...

Attack - PDF Silent HTTP Form Repurposing Attacks

http://www.secniche.org/papers/SNS_09_03_PDF_Silent_Form_Re_Purp_Attack.pdf

Anonymous said...

XSS Relocation Attacks through Word Hyperlinking

http://www.secniche.org/papers/SNS_09_01_Evad_Xss_Filter_Msword.pdf

Jeremiah Grossman said...

Thanks all, added (49, 50, 51)

Inferno said...

Hi Jeremiah,

Here are some of my contributions-

http://securethoughts.com/2009/07/hacking-csrf-tokens-using-css-history-hack/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/08/hijacking-safari-4-top-sites-with-phish-bombs/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/08/bypassing-owasp-esapi-xss-protection-inside-javascript/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/11/using-blended-browser-threats-involving-chrome-to-steal-files-on-your-computer/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/08/pwning-opera-unite-with-infernos-eleven/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/05/exploiting-ie8-utf-7-xss-vulnerability-using-local-redirection/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/11/millions-of-pdf-invisibly-embedded-with-your-internal-disk-paths/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/10/hijacking-operas-native-page-using-malicious-rss-payloads/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/07/rsnakes-javascript-ping-sweep-attack-extended-for-internet-explorer-8/

http://securethoughts.com/2009/02/unauthorized-tinyurl-url-enumeration-vulnerability/

Regards,
Inferno

Jeremiah Grossman said...

Thanks Inferno, added all except one. (#52 - # 59)

0kn0ck said...

Hi Jer

Yahoo Babelfish - Possible Frame Injection Attack - Design Stringency

http://zeroknock.blogspot.com/2009/12/yahoo-babelfish-possible-inline-iframe.html

Anonymous said...

Gmail - Google Docs Cookie Hijacking through PDF Repurposing

http://secniche.org/gmd_hijack/gc_hijack.xhtml

http://secniche.org/gmd_hijack/advisory_gmail_google_docs_pdf_repurposing_attack.pdf

Anonymous said...

IE8 Link Spoofing - Broken Status Bar Integrity

http://secniche.org/ie_spoof_myth/

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@0kn0ck, added #60

@anonymous, added #61 / #62

belch said...

Blind SQL Injection: Inference thourgh Underflow exception


http://dbellucci.blogspot.com/2009/12/blind-sql-injection-inference-through.html

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@belch, thank you. #63

Stephen Sclafani said...

http://stephensclafani.com/2009/05/26/exploiting-unexploitable-xss/

http://stephensclafani.com/2009/05/04/clickjacking-oauth/

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@Stephen, thank you. Added #64 and #65

Amish Shah said...

"iPhone SSL Warning and Safari Phishing" attack points to 404 page.

The correct hyper link would be,

http://ha.ckers.org/blog/20090329/iphone-ssl-warning-and-safari-phishing/

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@Amish, thanks fixed.

Adi said...

This new type of attack is generic , will work on any system/OS/browser, doesn't relate to any implementation bug, and shows how can hackers penetrate VPN or even disconnected networks

Active Man in the Middle Attacks:
http://blog.watchfire.com/wfblog/2009/02/active-man-in-the-middle-attacks.html

Happy holiday season,
Adi

0kn0ck said...

Google Translate - Google User Content - File Uploading Cross - XSS and Design Stringency - A Talk

http://zeroknock.blogspot.com/2009/12/google-translate-google-user-content.html

Adi said...

Hi Jeremiah,

This new type of attack is generic , will work on any system/OS/browser, doesn't rely on any implementation bug, and shows how can hackers penetrate VPN or even closed networks.

Active Man in the Middle Attacks:
http://blog.watchfire.com/wfblog/2009/02/active-man-in-the-middle-attacks.html

Happy holiday season,
Adi

MustLive said...

Jeremiah!

List of 2009 Web Hacking Techniques is a good thing (as it were with previous lists for 2007 and 2008).

Soon I'll write you about my 2009's web hacking techniques.

P.S.

Happy holidays to everyone.

MustLive said...

Current list is interesting, but I must note about some of its items.

There are contributions by other researchers which is just the same as my own, but I did my own months and even years earlier :-). Like 0kn0ck's one about Yahoo Babelfish (which mentioned as #60). And also new 0kn0ck's comment about Google Translate.

I wrote about this hole in Yahoo Babelfish (on both babelfish.altavista.com and babelfish.yahoo.com) in beginning of 2009 (and found hole at 25.04.2008 and informed Yahoo which ignored to fix it).

About such XSS attacks which I called Remote XSS/HTML Include (and fun guys called it Frame Injection) I wrote many times at my site for last three years.

Like vulnerabilities at images.google.com (in 2007), images.search.yahoo.com (in 2008) and www.google.com and translate.google.com (in 2008) and at many other sites. And in all cases web site owners ignored to fix the holes.

So I recommend 0kn0ck to not touch my holes (which I found a long time before him) and find others (new ones) for himself ;-). I very often see such cases, when other people found my holes after months and years after me :-). There was such case with hole in images.google.com, and here are cases with Yahoo Babelfish and Google Translate. Anyway I wish everyone Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Ronen (ronen at quaji com) said...

A new type of attack allowing cross-site identification using out of context information from social networks.

http://blog.quaji.com/2009/12/out-of-context-information-disclosure.html

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@0kn0ck, added #66. And please have a look at MustLive's work he cited. It does appear to look similar, but if not, would be helpful to know why. Either way, researchers including myself do cross paths with the work of others without knowing it.

@adi, added #67 - thank you.

@ronen, added #68 thanks.

0kn0ck said...

Jer

There is no point of cross path as such. Primarily it is hard for a researcher to visit every blog or vice versa. It may be result as a same thing but the attack end points and explanation could vary depending to the disclosure done to the requisite vendor and their response.

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@0kn0ck understood, which is a big reason why I've been making such lists. To be a repository for reference if nothing else.

0kn0ck said...

Jer

That's a great step.Another interesting discussion. Have a look:

http://zeroknock.blogspot.com/2009/12/google-chrome-webkit-msword-scripting.html

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@0kn0ck, added #70

Inferno said...

Very cool cross-browser cross-domain css exploit by Chris Evans
http://scarybeastsecurity.blogspot.com/2009/12/generic-cross-browser-cross-domain.html

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@Inferno, thanks added #70

Anonymous said...

Research titled "Advanced SQL injection to operating system full control" slides and whitepaper.
Research titled "Expanding the control over the operating system from the database" slides
It's by the same author of sqlmap. The best in the field!

.mario said...

I think we can add HTML+TIME XSS attacks working on all IEs from 5.5 to 8 like tweeted here:

https://twitter.com/0x6D6172696F/status/7197250108

https://twitter.com/0x6D6172696F/status/7196350903

https://twitter.com/0x6D6172696F/status/7196312532

https://twitter.com/0x6D6172696F/status/7180793115

Introduces loads of new possible vectors mostly unknown by devs and not filtered by common WAF/filter solutions.

Avi Douglen said...

Hey Jeremiah,
Just a heads up wrt #68, the name was changed to Cross-Site Identification (or XSId, of course :) ).

I think this name much better reflects the real impact of the issue.

A.D.

Jeremiah Grossman said...

@Avi - updated.

MustLive said...

Jeremiah!

Yesterday I wrote you a new letter (in addition to my first letter) with other my 2009's researches.

And also with mentioning of Soroush Dalili's research on IIS, which you also can look at. As I see you already mentioned it in #69 (you can add a link to pdf with advisory too).

avivra said...

My contribution:
* Cross-Web2.0 Scripting
http://aviv.raffon.net/2009/05/18/CrossWeb20Scripting.aspx
* Month of Twitter Bugs
http://aviv.raffon.net/2009/06/15/MonthOfTwitterBugs.aspx
http://www.twitpwn.com
* Flash Shared Object - Bypass “Private Browsing” mode
http://aviv.raffon.net/2009/08/17/NotSoPrivateAfterAll.aspx

acheter kamagra said...

Il n'ya pas de point de croix chemin en tant que telle. Principalement, il est difficile pour un chercheur de visiter tous les blogs, ou vice versa. Il peut être le résultat en une même chose, mais les points d'extrémité d'attaque et explication pourrait varier en fonction de la divulgation faite au vendeur nécessaires et leur réponse.